Price / Riffle / Chamberlain / Brenholts

Person Page 28

Samuel Fisher1

M, #676, b. 8-May-1808

Parents

FatherJohn Fisher (b. 9-Jan-1769, d. 13-Oct-1838)
MotherBetsey Dean (b. 24-Jun-1776, d. 20-Nov-1858)

Biography

DeathSamuel Fisher died in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B1,1
ResidenceHe lived at Oatka Street in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B Sam's father John lived there with him. Had a fine farm, was an important man in the town. Precise location said to be "Oatka Street, off the West side of South Main."1
Birth8-May-1808He was born on 8-May-1808 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1,2,1,3
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.
  2. [S17] Compiler: Annis, Daniel Gage, Original Publisher: Granite State Pub. Co., Vital records of Londonderry, New Hampshire : a full and accurate transcript of the births, marriage intentions, marriages, and deaths in this town from the earliest date to 1910, Original Publisher Location: Manchester, NH, Original Published Date: 1914 (Genealogical Pub. Co., Baltimore, MD, 1994), Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number 94-78265. ISBN 0-8063-1415-X. Clayton Library Call Number 974.2 A615 NH. Compiled from the town books, church records, graveyard inscriptions, and other sources by Daniel Gage Annis ; the subject matter edited, with introduction, sketches, and annotations by George Waldo Browne.
  3. [S17] Compiler: Annis, Daniel Gage, Original Publisher: Granite State Pub. Co., Vital records of Londonderry, New Hampshire : a full and accurate transcript of the births, marriage intentions, marriages, and deaths in this town from the earliest date to 1910, Original Publisher Location: Manchester, NH, Original Published Date: 1914 (Genealogical Pub. Co., Baltimore, MD, 1994)

Phinehas Dean Fisher1

M, #677, b. 6-Dec-1810

Parents

FatherJohn Fisher (b. 9-Jan-1769, d. 13-Oct-1838)
MotherBetsey Dean (b. 24-Jun-1776, d. 20-Nov-1858)

Biography

DeathPhinehas Dean Fisher died in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, United States.B1,1
OccupationPhinehas Dean Fisher was a Minister.1,1
Birth6-Dec-1810He was born on 6-Dec-1810 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1,1
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.

Nathaniel Dean Fisher1

M, #678, b. 15-Mar-1804, d. 13-Sep-1887

Parents

FatherJohn Fisher (b. 9-Jan-1769, d. 13-Oct-1838)
MotherBetsey Dean (b. 24-Jun-1776, d. 20-Nov-1858)

Family:

SonSon 2 Fisher (b. abt 1834)
SonSon 1 Fisher (b. abt 1834)

Biography

ResidenceNathaniel Dean Fisher lived at North side of West Buffalo StreetB in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B Reportedly had a big house in Warsaw.
OccupationNathaniel Dean Fisher was an Engaged in "business" here and in Canada in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B
AnecdoteExecutor of Father's Will. Two sons, never married.1
ResidenceHe lived at North side of West Buffalo StreetB in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B
Birth15-Mar-1804He was born on 15-Mar-1804 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1,1
Retirementaft 1865He retired aft 1865 in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B Retired after the Civil War a wealthy man.2
Death13-Sep-1887He died on 13-Sep-1887 at age 83 in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B1,1
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.
  2. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely, Letter from Sydney Fisher

James P. Fisher1

M, #679, b. 1-Jan-1813

Parents

FatherJohn Fisher (b. 9-Jan-1769, d. 13-Oct-1838)
MotherBetsey Dean (b. 24-Jun-1776, d. 20-Nov-1858)

Biography

DeathJames P. Fisher died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States.B1,1
OccupationJames P. Fisher was a Minister.1,1
Birth1-Jan-1813He was born on 1-Jan-1813 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1,1
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.

Caleb Ellis Fisher1,2

M, #680, b. 13-May-1815

Parents

FatherJohn Fisher (b. 9-Jan-1769, d. 13-Oct-1838)
MotherBetsey Dean (b. 24-Jun-1776, d. 20-Nov-1858)

Biography

DeathCaleb Ellis Fisher died in Oberlin, Lorain County, Ohio, United States.B1,1
OccupationCaleb Ellis Fisher was a Minister.
EducationHe was educated at Oberlin College in Oberlin, Lorain County, Ohio, United States.B
AnecdoteHenry Cowles-1029 loaned Caleb money, then gave him more money so that Caleb could continue on at Oberlin.
Birth13-May-1815He was born on 13-May-1815 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1,1
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.
  2. His descendant Ray Fisher is a retired professor of history at UCLA (as of 1978). Caleb was a prominent minister, graduated from Oberlin College and was greatly indebted to Henry Cowles (brother of Mary Ann Cowles) who loaned him money and then gave him money so he could continue on at Oberlin.

David Ela1

M, #681, b. about 1744

Family: Agnes Nancy Fisher (b. 17-Apr-1747)

DaughterCharlotte Ela (b. say 1770)
DaughterLois Ela (b. say 1771)
DaughterSally Ela (b. say 1772)
SonWilliam Ela (b. say 1773)
SonClark Ela (b. say 1774)

Biography

MarriageDavid Ela and Agnes Nancy Fisher were married.1
DeathDavid Ela died in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B2
Birthabt 1744He was born abt 1744 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.
  2. [S16] Parker, Reverend Edward L., Original Publisher: Perkins and Whipple, The History of Londonderry. Comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N.H., Original Publisher Location: Boston, MA, Original Published Date: 1851 (Town of Londonderry, Londonderry, N.H., 1974), Library of Congress Catalog Number 74-16922

Cyrus Taber1

M, #682, b. 19-Jan-1800

Parents

FatherPaul Taber (b. 3-Dec-1774, d. 25-Dec-1826)
MotherLucy Brown (b. abt 1777)

Family:

SonStephen Cole Taber (b. abt 1830)

Biography

Reference NoCyrus Taber has reference number 688.
Birth19-Jan-1800He was born on 19-Jan-1800.2,2
Residencebef 1820He lived in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, United StatesB, bef 1820. He arrived in Fort Wayne with $400, but fever and ague attacked him and by the time he recovered, that money was gone. He thus started over from scratch, splitting rails for 50 cents a day3
Residencebef 1820He lived in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, United StatesB, bef 1820.3
Last Edited27-Jul-2006

Citations

  1. [S73] Listenberger, Rosemary, Letter from Rosemary Listenberger to Barbara Brown with Taber family research attached, Recipient: Brown, Barbara, Author Address: Plymouth, IN (23 Mar 1993), Ms. Listenberger is a descendant of Henry Clay Taber, son of Samuel Dennis Taber and Jane Pope, Handwritten family group sheets, unknown original source.
  2. [S73] Listenberger, Rosemary, Letter from Rosemary Listenberger to Barbara Brown with Taber family research attached, Recipient: Brown, Barbara, Author Address: Plymouth, IN (23 Mar 1993), Handwritten family group sheets, unknown original source.
  3. [S73] Listenberger, Rosemary, Letter from Rosemary Listenberger to Barbara Brown with Taber family research attached, Recipient: Brown, Barbara, Author Address: Plymouth, IN (23 Mar 1993), from "Thomas Swinney, Donor of Fort Wayne's First Park"

Agnes Nancy Fisher1

F, #683, b. 17-Apr-1747

Parents

FatherSamuel Fisher (b. 29-Jul-1722, d. 10-Apr-1806)
MotherSarah Agnes Taylor (b. 6-Mar-1725/26, d. 17-Apr-1747)

Family 1: William Cunningham (b. say 1747)

Family 2: David Ela (b. abt 1744)

DaughterCharlotte Ela (b. say 1770)
DaughterLois Ela (b. say 1771)
DaughterSally Ela (b. say 1772)
SonWilliam Ela (b. say 1773)
SonClark Ela (b. say 1774)

Biography

NameAgnes Nancy Fisher was also known as Ela, (Fisher.)1
NameShe was also known as Cunningham.2
MarriageDavid Ela and Agnes Nancy Fisher were married.1
MarriageWilliam Cunningham and Agnes Nancy Fisher were married.3
AnecdoteNancy's part of father's will: $10 + already rec'd, 1 yr after decease1
Birth17-Apr-1747She was born on 17-Apr-1747 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1,4
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.
  2. [S16] Parker, Reverend Edward L., Original Publisher: Perkins and Whipple, The History of Londonderry. Comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N.H., Original Publisher Location: Boston, MA, Original Published Date: 1851 (Town of Londonderry, Londonderry, N.H., 1974), Library of Congress Catalog Number 74-16922
  3. [S16] Parker, Reverend Edward L., Original Publisher: Perkins and Whipple, The History of Londonderry. Comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N.H., Original Publisher Location: Boston, MA, Original Published Date: 1851 (Town of Londonderry, Londonderry, N.H., 1974)
  4. [S18] Patrick, Ron, A Carter and Patrick Family of Canada, Record Type: GEDCOM file, Author E-mail: email address, Document Url: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=rpatrick (01 Apr 2005, Access Date, 15 Apr 2005)

John Fisher1

M, #684, b. 9-Jan-1769, d. 13-Oct-1838
ReferencesPedigree List

Parents

FatherSamuel Fisher (b. 29-Jul-1722, d. 10-Apr-1806)
MotherSarah Barber (b. 26-May-1732, d. 2-Feb-1813)

Family: Betsey Dean (b. 24-Jun-1776, d. 20-Nov-1858)

DaughterLucy Chickering Fisher (b. 4-Sep-1799)
DaughterBetsey D. Fisher (b. 15-Apr-1801, d. 21-Nov-1869)
SonNathaniel Dean Fisher (b. 15-Mar-1804, d. 13-Sep-1887)
SonJohn Fisher (b. 13-Mar-1806, d. 28-Mar-1882)
SonSamuel Fisher (b. 8-May-1808)
SonPhinehas Dean Fisher (b. 6-Dec-1810)
SonJames P. Fisher (b. 1-Jan-1813)
SonCaleb Ellis Fisher (b. 13-May-1815)
DaughterMary Fisher (b. 14-May-1817, d. 1897)

Biography

BurialJohn Fisher was buried at Warsaw Cemetery in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B1,1
OccupationJohn Fisher was a Farmer.1,1
Birth9-Jan-1769He was born on 9-Jan-1769 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1,1
Marriage24-Oct-1798He and Betsey Dean were married on 24-Oct-1798.1,1
Death13-Oct-1838John Fisher died on 13-Oct-1838 at age 69 in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B1,1
Will19-Oct-1841He signed a will on 19-Oct-1841 in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, United States.B Family called to Probate meeting on 30 Aug 18411
Last Edited1-Apr-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.

Samuel Fisher1,2

M, #685, b. 29-Jul-1722, d. 10-Apr-1806
ReferencesPedigree List

Parents

FatherJohn Fisher, III (b. 6-Dec-1675)
MotherSarah (b. abt 1677)

Family 1: Sarah Agnes Taylor (b. 6-Mar-1725/26, d. 17-Apr-1747)

DaughterAgnes Nancy Fisher (b. 17-Apr-1747)

Family 2: Agnes Wilson (b. 8-Aug-1728, d. 12-Mar-1755)

DaughterGennett Fisher (b. 1750, d. 5-Mar-1843)
DaughterSarah Fisher (b. 26-Oct-1752, d. 20-Nov-1772)
SonJames Fisher (b. 26-Oct-1752)
DaughterJane Fisher (b. 24-Oct-1753, d. abt 1848)

Family 3: Sarah Barber (b. 26-May-1732, d. 2-Feb-1813)

DaughterMary Fisher (b. 6-May-1757, d. 1827)
SonSamuel Fisher (b. 26-Aug-1758, d. 12-May-1812)
DaughterMargret Fisher (b. 18-Apr-1760)
SonWilliam Fisher (b. 1-Dec-1762, d. 25-Oct-1775)
SonEbenezer Fisher (b. 9-Apr-1764, d. 1848)
DaughterMartha Fisher (b. 14-Jan-1766, d. 21-Jun-1837)
SonJohn Fisher (b. 9-Jan-1769, d. 13-Oct-1838)

Biography

BurialSamuel Fisher was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B1
ReligionHe was Presbyterian. He was a ruling elder of the church in the West Parish, remaining such until old age m.3,4
AnecdoteAccording to the Tennessee census bureau, one in five Tennesseans can trace their roots directly to the Scots-Irish settlers of the 18th century. Most of these settlers are of Ulster Protestant/Presbyterian stock who were forced under British rule to flee their country. So claims Billy Kennedy, who has researched the topic and written about it in his book, The Scots-Irish in the Hills of Tennessee.

The Scots-Irish originated in Lowland Scotland and moved to Ulster throughout the 17th century. At the start things were good, as Ulster was under the rule of King William III who granted them civil and religious liberties.

The Scots, who were originally involved in farming, began to establish industries with the French Huguenots, allies of King William. The two groups came together and established churches and schools for their people.

William's reign ended in 1702 when he was succeeded by his sister-in-law, Anne. She passed a series of acts which were unfavourable to the Scots, placed severe restrictions on their Presbyterian faith and forced many of them out of their jobs.

Along with this, Ulster was experiencing an economic crisis; the textile industry was in a recession, small peasant farmers could not cope with the droughts of those years and landlords were charging exorbitant rents. Faced with this and the embitterment of the discriminatory religious policies, many of the Scots settlers found they had no choice but to leave Ulster and start a new life in America.

The first ship to leave Ulster was The Friends' Goodwill which set sail from Larne, Co Antrim, for Boston in April 1717.

Emigration continued throughout the century and became so widespread that the British Government was eventually forced to sit up and take notice. A commission was appointed to investigate the cause of emigration, and some of the religious laws were relaxed.

On reaching North America, the Scots-Irish headed for Pennsylvania, the Carolinas and Virginia. They were warmly received and noted for their honesty, independence of spirit and ability to work hard. They tended to stick together and, because they had little money, were driven to the frontier regions, the hills and inland areas where land was cheap.

In June 1796, when Tennessee became a state, the Ulster settlers moved to its hills and set up home. Once established, they began to set up churches and schools and became pioneers of education in the region. Presbyterianism became the first Christian denomination to be established in the state and today accounts for 132,344 members.

Along with religion, the settlers brought with them their traditions of storytelling, singing, dancing and making "moonshine", illicit whiskey. To this day, a lot of the country and Western music can be traced back to the Ulster settlers. Dolly Parton is said to be a descendant of the Scots-Irish.

The traditional square dance, clogging to fiddle-backed music, also comes from the settlers. In those days, the fiddler was one of the most respected people in the area.

The practice of distilling illegal whiskey had its origins in 16th-century Scotland, but was brought to Ulster when the Scots moved. Both whiskey and brandy were made from ingredients such as barley, raisins, rye and corn which grew in abundance around the hills of Tennessee. The moonshine, dubbed "white lightning", was very potent and readily available in the area.

After the Revolutionary War, whiskey was taxed and the mountain settlers threatened to take up arms against the government of George Washington. This incident became known as the "Whiskey Revolution" and was eventually settled.

When the alcoholic prohibition was imposed in the 1920s, the distilling of moonshine became widespread throughout the US, although it eventually died out in most states. However, moonshine-making persists in the Appalachia region of Tennessee, a tradition carried on by the distant relatives of the 17th-century settlers.

Although most Scots-Irish made a career of farming, several became involved in politics and went on to great things, including the establishment of great cities.

Of the 56 signatures on the Declaration of Independence, July 4th, 1776, eight were of Scots-Irish descent. Eleven US Presidents, including Jackson, Wilson and Nixon, can trace direct ancestry back to the Ulster settlers. Also, Sam Houston, the man responsible for wresting Texas from Mexican control, was the grandson of an Ulster Presbyterian, as was the frontiersman and later Congressman, Davy Crockett.

So it is with great pride that Tennesseans trace their blood back to Ireland, and remember their ancestors who left the hillsides of Antrim and Down to create a civilisation in a wilderness and help to lay the foundations of what today is possibly the greatest nation on the earth.

The Scots-Irish in the Hills of Tennessee by Billy Kennedy. Causeway Press, costs £8.99 paperback, £14.99 hardback. See our Scottish Books section to order the book!
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/world/tennessee.htm
An Irishwoman's Diary
By Caroline McEldowney
AnecdoteAmerican History
The Old 300
contributed by Tex Rogers
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Tex Rogers (c)Copyright 1999 Southwest Scots
Although many cultures can stake a claim on the settlement of early Texas - mostly the Spanish, Indians and French - it was the Scots and others of Celtic descent who led the way in truly taming the wild territory and bringing it forward to a republic.
More than 85 percent of the pioneers who renounced their American citizenship to follow Stephen F. Austin into the Mexican state of Tejas were of Celtic origin, and half that number were of Scottish descent.
In all, 342 pioneers applied for the 297 grants (thus, the term Old Three Hundred) of land given to Austin by the Mexican government. Most were distributed from 1823-24 and the remainder in 1827. These pioneers were indeed hardy souls who were simply following an ethnic course established generations before on the border of Scotland and England.
Just who these people were and what drove them to give up being citizens of the recently-formed United States for the hope of land in the wild Texas territory is eloquently explained by the imminent historian T.R. Fehrenbach in "Lone Star: A History of Texas and the Texans" (MacMillan, 1968).
In his award-winning book, considered by many the most definitive one-volume history of Texas, Fehrenbach devoted an entire chapter to "The Anglo-Celts," in which he detailed in great length the history, migratory patterns and culture of that tough, stubborn people who were shoved from their Scottish borders to Ireland, and eventually across the Atlantic to the New World.
With the Calvinist teachings of John Knox still ringing in their ears, this latest wave of New Worlders were looking for new opportunities on new frontiers, Fehrenbach wrote. Pushing inward from the towns on the Atlantic Coast, these Anglo-Celts found themselves first in Appalachia, then in Kentucky and Tennessee, before finally finding Texas.
The author's explanation of the Anglo-Celtic ethos makes it easily understood why they followed Austin westward in search of land to an area between the Lavaca and Brazos rivers in southeast Texas which now encompasses Austin, Colorado, Washington, Brazos, Grimes, Wharton, Matagorda, Fort Bend counties and portions of Jackson, Harris and Chambers counties. On a Texas map, the colony encompassed territory from Anahuac east of Houston down the gulf coast as far west as Edna, and north to Bryan-College Station.
In taking up the quest for new land, they agreed to renounce their U.S. Citizenship and become citizens of Spain. They also agreed to become Catholics, but that requirement was waived tacitly by Mexican officials as long as no preachers were found in the new colony.
It was Moses Austin (Clan Keith), a Connecticut-born mine operator who had the initial dream of bringing Americans from the United States into Spanish Territory in Texas. Austin had a successful experience with the Spanish when he was allowed to settle 30 families in Spanish-held Missouri in 1797. Austin proved to be a very good Spanish citizen, and a prominent leader. And after Missouri became part of the United States again in 1804 after the Louisiana Purchase, Austin prospered even more, becoming a founder and principal stockholder in the Bank of Saint Louis.
Then in 1818 the young nation experienced its first national depression that left Austin completely broke when his bank collapsed. Having no loyalty to the United States because of its financial policies, the 55-year-old Moses Austin decided he could do better colonizing Spanish territory. So in the fall of 1820, he set out of an 800-mile trek to San Antonio de Béxar.
Austin wasn't welcome in San Antonio because the Spanish were still recovering from the escapades of Dr. James Long, who the previous year had led a small army into Texas and establish a republic, only to be executed in Mexico City. Austin found that no Americans were welcome in San Antonio, and he was told by the governor to get out of town before sunset or face arrest.
But before a dejected Austin left San Antonio he met an old friend, the Felipe Enrique Neri, Baron de Bastrop, whom Austin had dealings with formerly in Louisiana. Poor but still well respected in San Antonio, Bastrop was able to gain a new audience with the governor, and argued Austin's case for colonizing Texas with Americans who were willing to come.
Bastrop offered three arguments:
•The Indian in Texas would never end until the country between San Antonio and the Sabine was settled. The Comanches acted like the owned the entire territory at the time.
•No Spaniards or Mexicans were coming to Texas, even after several centuries of Spain trying to colonize the area. In fact, more were leaving Texas.
•Colonization by willing Anglo-Saxons had been successful in Louisiana, and there appeared to other way to put people on the land.
So on Jan. 27, 1821, a petition in the name of Moses Austin was granted. Mexican officials had become convinced that a band of American colonists in Texas might create a buffer between Spanish settlements and the Indians, and that the right kind of Americans who were loyal to be Spanish Crown would prevent future encroachments into Texas because they would have an immense stake in the land, as Fehrenbach wrote.
But Austin never saw his dreamed fulfilled. He arrived back in Missouri in time to die, but not before he asked his son Stephen to carry on the dream.
Stephen F. Austin needed no encouragement. He despised the land system of the United States, which encouraged speculation, while the Spanish system rewarded colonization.
The young Austin traveled from Louisiana to San Antonio where he met with the Spanish governor, who acknowledged him as his father's successor. By the time Austin returned to Louisiana, more than a hundred letters from applicants awaiting for him. People were already standing in line, wanting to come to Texas.
From 1823-24 Austin and the land commissioner Baron de Bastrop issued 272 titles. Bastrop was called away from the colony for a short period and an additional 35 titles were not issued until 1827, by Gaspar Flores de Abrego, a new land commissioner. In all, 307 titles were issued to 297 grantees.
Most of the families who followed Austin to Texas came as farmers, but several were already of substantial means from the Trans-Appalachia South. they were all were part of a large westward migration from the Eastern Seaboard states that had begun in the late 1700's. To avoid problems among the colonists, Austin attempted to select only those of "better" classes, and indeed, only four of the grantees could not read.
So, armed with an independent self-reliance strengthened by generational advances through Appalachia, and fortified by a Calvinistic code the stressed discipline, hard work and perseverance, those who followed Stephen F. Austin to Texas carried names linked to Scottish clans like Anderson, Andrews, Bailey, Barnett, Beard, Bell and Bowman. There were also Brown, Callihan, Carter, Charles, Clark, Clarke, Coats, Coles, Cooper, Cumings, Cummins and Davidson.
There were names like Duty, Dyer, Elder, Fenton, Fisher, Frazier, George, Gilbert, Gilleland, Gray, Guthrie, Haddon, Hall, Hamilton and Harris, as well as Harvey, Haynes, Hope, Hudson and Hunter. There were Ingram, Jamison, Johnson, Keller, Kelly, Kennedy, Kennon and Kerr, along with Linsey and Little.
Other among the grantees were McClain, McCormick, McCoy, McCrosky, McFarlan, McKinney, McKinsey, McNair, McNeel, McNutt and McWilliams, along with Martin, Mathis, Miller, Moore, Morrison and Morton. There were also Nelson, Nuckols, Parks, Phelps, Phillips, Prater, Ramey, Rankin, Richarson, Roberts, Robertson, Robinson and Ross. Also, Scobey, Scott, Sims, Smith, Spencer and Sutherland. Among the names were also Taylor, Thomas, Thompson, Walker, Wallace, White and Wilkins.
In all, there were only two names of German origin, eight from France, and two of Dutch extraction. The remainder carried names affiliated to Scottish clans or of Celtic stock from the British Isles.
The Celt's common quest in Texas was land, a commodity many of their ancestors had lost in Scotland and Ireland, and these new Texians were willing to face isolation, back-breaking work and Indian perils on new borders to hold on to it.
As Fehrenbach wrote in Lone Star: "The Anglo-Celts had not crossed the sea to become servile tenants."
The group of Scots, Irish and other Celts who followed Austin into Texas was just the beginning. Many more, with names such as Houston, Bowie, Crawford, Everitt, Grimes, Coleman, Bower, Carson, Latimer, Stewart and Briscoe would eventually declare their independence from Mexico, and some would die for that belief.

More information may be obtained from the organization Descendants of Austin's Old Three Hundred, by writing its president, Shirley Steadman, P.O. Box 185, Marion, TX 78124. Readers may also be interested in the new book "Austin's Old 300 - The First Anglo Colony in Texas: A Genealogical Profile," (ISBN 1-57168-291-0), $21.95, published by Eakin Press, P.O. Box 23066, Austin, TX 78735.

South West Scots magazine (January, April, July, October) covering Scottish/Celtic culture and activities in the Southwest U.S.A.. To subscribe in USA send check or money order of $11.95 for 4 issues in U.S., or $19.95 for 8 issues to: Southwest Scots, P.O. Box 651, Columbus, TX 78934.) You can email them at saltex@pdq.net
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/america/old300.htm
AnecdoteAmerican History
Colonial Scots-Irish Immigrants: The Irish Records
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This article was originally published in The Irish At Home and Abroad journal of Irish genealogy and heritage (volume 2 #1, 1994/1995). Published four times yearly.
By Kyle J. Betit

This article focuses on sources and techniques in American records for tracing Scots-Irish immigrants who came to colonial America. Many thousands of Scots-Irish immigrants came prior to 1776, with large-scale immigration beginning in 1718. Immigration to America was at a standstill during the American Revolution (1775-1783), but following the Revolution many Scots-Irish continued to come to the United States. However, this article focuses on the pre-1776 immigrants.

For the purposes of this article, the term "Scots-Irish" refers to settlers who were born in or resided in Ireland but whose earlier origins (whether personal or ancestral) were in Scotland. They have also been called "Scotch-Irish," "Ulster Scots," and "Irish Presbyterians."

Historical Background

Scots-Irish immigrants came from the historic province of Ulster (in the north of Ireland). Scottish settlers began to come in large numbers to Ulster in the early decades of the 1600s. James I, the English monarch, sought to solidify control by transferring land ownership to Protestants and by settling their lands with Protestant tenants (English and Scottish). Scottish settlers continued to come to Ireland throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Scots-Irish immigrants settled in the American colonies from the 1600s. However, the first major migration of Scots-Irish to America was a group that came with Rev. James McGregor from County Londonderry to New England in 1718. They arrived at Boston, and many of them moved to New Hampshire, establishing the town of Londonderry.

The majority of the Scots-Irish who came to America in the colonial period settled in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the Carolinas. Nonetheless, there was significant Scots-Irish settlement in each of the thirteen American colonies.

Many of the earliest Scots-Irish immigrants (of the 1720s and 1730s) first settled in Pennsylvania. Many then moved down from Pennsylvania into Virginia and the Carolinas. From there immigrants and their descendants went on to populate the states of Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee in the 1780s and 1790s.

There are a myriad of possible reasons for the immigration of so many of the Scots-Irish to America in the 1700s. High rents and religious persecution have often been blamed. Most of the Scots-Irish came freely to the American colonies, although there were also some who were deported as prisoners or came as indentured servants. Others came with British Army regiments and remained in the American colonies.

It is important to keep in mind that just because an ancestor came from Ireland to America during the colonial period does not mean that he/she was necessarily Scots-Irish. Many Anglicans, Catholics, and Quakers also came from Ireland during this time period. An ancestor from Ireland can often be identified as Scots-Irish from: family tradition; the surname; the given names in the family; association with other Scots-Irish; or identification as a Presbyterian.

Group/Congregational Migrations

The Scots-Irish largely came to colonial America in family groups, often such that members of an extended family settled near one another in America, whether they immigrated together or separately. Some Scots-Irish immigrants came to America as part of larger group or congregational migrations, meaning that an entire group or congregation of Presbyterians together moved from one locality in Ireland to one locality in America. It is thus very important to trace persons that immigrated with a Scots-Irish ancestor or were associated with the ancestor in America.

In some cases, the immigrating group was led by a minister. In such instances, the minister may be traced back to the church he served in Ireland. Most of the immigrants who accompanied him would be from the same area. However, a group or congregational migration may have drawn from a larger area than just one town or parish in Ireland.
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/america/scots_irish.htm
Birth29-Jul-1722He was born on 29-Jul-1722 in Londonderry, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom.B He was of Scottish descent. His father was a weaver. Name comes possibly from Scottish Clan Campbell.1,5
Immigration1740He immigrated in 1740 to Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States.B From Ireland to America. On "The starved ship." In 1740 he sailed to America on a vessel which was becalmed in the North Atlantic, the so-called "Starved Ship". The ship ran out of food, people died, and some ate the flesh of those who had died and became very ill. It was decided to kill and eat one of the passengers so the rest could survive. The lot fell on Samuel Fisher, but being Christian people thay gave him two days to prepare. In the meantime a ship hove in sight, saw the distress signals, and sent a boat to give them provisions - saving Samuel and his many descendants. The horror of that passage made a lasting impression on Samuel Fisher. He could not stand to see even a morsel of food wasted, or water thrown carelessly on the ground.1
Occupationfrom 1740 - 1742From 1740 - 1742 Samuel Fisher was an Indentured Servant: when the ship landed, the Captain sold Samuel to a man in Roxbury as an inden in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States.B
Occupation29-Jul-1740On 29-Jul-1740 Samuel Fisher was a Weaver. He was an apprentice weaver as a youth, his father was a weaver. Likely became a full weav in Londonderry, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom.B1,1
Occupation1742In 1742 Samuel Fisher was a farmer in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B
Marriage24-Jun-1745He and Sarah Agnes Taylor were married on 24-Jun-1745 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B Agnes was the daughter of Samuel's landlord.1,6,7
Marriage29-Jul-1747Samuel Fisher and Agnes Wilson were married on 29-Jul-1747.1
Marriage15-Feb-1756Samuel Fisher and Sarah Barber were married on 15-Feb-1756.1,1
Will4-Jul-1797Samuel Fisher signed a will on 4-Jul-1797 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B witness: Thomas Patterson,Josiah Jones,Hughey Anderson1
Death10-Apr-1806He died on 10-Apr-1806 at age 83 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.B It is reported that of his 12 children, 11 lived to adulthood, 10 married, and 10 outlived him, most living to advanced ages. By 1850 his descendants numbered 915, scattered throughout the states and Canada. It was estimated at that time that 75% of those over twenty years of age were professors of religion/1,6
Last Edited28-Mar-2012

Citations

  1. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.
  2. Described as tall and commanding in personal appearance. His countenance was "grave and solemn, so that few would willingly be guilty of levity in his presence."
  3. [S16] Parker, Reverend Edward L., Original Publisher: Perkins and Whipple, The History of Londonderry. Comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N.H., Original Publisher Location: Boston, MA, Original Published Date: 1851 (Town of Londonderry, Londonderry, N.H., 1974), Library of Congress Catalog Number 74-16922, p.219
  4. [S16] Parker, Reverend Edward L., Original Publisher: Perkins and Whipple, The History of Londonderry. Comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N.H., Original Publisher Location: Boston, MA, Original Published Date: 1851 (Town of Londonderry, Londonderry, N.H., 1974), p.219
  5. [S16] Parker, Reverend Edward L., Original Publisher: Perkins and Whipple, The History of Londonderry. Comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N.H., Original Publisher Location: Boston, MA, Original Published Date: 1851 (Town of Londonderry, Londonderry, N.H., 1974), p.218
  6. [S16] Parker, Reverend Edward L., Original Publisher: Perkins and Whipple, The History of Londonderry. Comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N.H., Original Publisher Location: Boston, MA, Original Published Date: 1851 (Town of Londonderry, Londonderry, N.H., 1974)
  7. [S18] Patrick, Ron, A Carter and Patrick Family of Canada, Record Type: GEDCOM file, Author E-mail: email address, Document Url: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=rpatrick (01 Apr 2005, Access Date, 15 Apr 2005)

Thomas W. Swinney1

M, #686, b. 18-Nov-1803, d. Jan-1875
SWINNEY Thomas W

Parents

MotherRhesa Swinney (b. 1763, d. 21-Jan-1846)

Family: Lucy Taber (b. 5-Apr-1804, d. 1860)

DaughterMinerva Swinney (b. 3-Nov-1828, d. aft 1854)
DaughterRhesa Swinney (b. 1-Sep-1830, d. 1-Sep-1911)
DaughterMargaret Swinney (b. 14-Aug-1834)
DaughterFrances E. Swinney (b. 7-Mar-1839, d. 4-Dec-1923)
DaughterCaroline Swinney (b. 31-Dec-1842, d. 4-Oct-1923)
SonWilliam Paul Swinney (b. Dec-1845, d. Jun-1886)

Biography

Reference NoThomas W. Swinney has reference number 692.
Birth18-Nov-1803He was born on 18-Nov-1803 in Piketon, Pike County, Ohio, United States.B2
Residence1822He lived in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, United StatesB, in 1822.2
Marriage20-Dec-1827He and Lucy Taber were married on 20-Dec-1827 in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, United States.B2
Land1828Tracts of land amounting to 60 acres in the northeast quarter of section 102
Anecdote17-Dec-1874In his will, Thomas Swinney donated land which became Fort Wayne's first park. Swinney Park consists of 46.3 acres east of St. Mary's River, and 48.24 acres west of the river2
DeathJan-1875Thomas W. Swinney died in Jan-1875 at age 71 in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, United States.B of a malignancy2
Last Edited27-Jul-2006

Citations

  1. [S73] Listenberger, Rosemary, Letter from Rosemary Listenberger to Barbara Brown with Taber family research attached, Recipient: Brown, Barbara, Author Address: Plymouth, IN (23 Mar 1993), Ms. Listenberger is a descendant of Henry Clay Taber, son of Samuel Dennis Taber and Jane Pope, from "Thomas Swinney, Donor of Fort Wayne's First Park"
  2. [S73] Listenberger, Rosemary, Letter from Rosemary Listenberger to Barbara Brown with Taber family research attached, Recipient: Brown, Barbara, Author Address: Plymouth, IN (23 Mar 1993), from "Thomas Swinney, Donor of Fort Wayne's First Park"

Lucy Taber1

F, #687, b. 5-Apr-1804, d. 1860
TABER Lucy

Parents

FatherPaul Taber (b. 3-Dec-1774, d. 25-Dec-1826)
MotherLucy Brown (b. abt 1777)

Family: Thomas W. Swinney (b. 18-Nov-1803, d. Jan-1875)

DaughterMinerva Swinney (b. 3-Nov-1828, d. aft 1854)
DaughterRhesa Swinney (b. 1-Sep-1830, d. 1-Sep-1911)
DaughterMargaret Swinney (b. 14-Aug-1834)
DaughterFrances E. Swinney (b. 7-Mar-1839, d. 4-Dec-1923)
DaughterCaroline Swinney (b. 31-Dec-1842, d. 4-Oct-1923)
SonWilliam Paul Swinney (b. Dec-1845, d. Jun-1886)

Biography

NameLucy Taber was also known as Swinney, (Taber.)2
NameShe was also known as Swinney.2
Reference NoShe has reference number 693.
Birth5-Apr-1804She was born on 5-Apr-1804 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States.B3,3
Witness1820She lived in the residence of Paul Taber in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, United StatesB, in 1820. His son Cyrus had gone to Fort Wayne earlier3
Marriage20-Dec-1827Thomas W. Swinney and Lucy Taber were married on 20-Dec-1827 in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, United States.B3
Death1860She died in 1860 at age ~56.3,3
Last Edited27-Jul-2006

Citations

  1. [S73] Listenberger, Rosemary, Letter from Rosemary Listenberger to Barbara Brown with Taber family research attached, Recipient: Brown, Barbara, Author Address: Plymouth, IN (23 Mar 1993), Ms. Listenberger is a descendant of Henry Clay Taber, son of Samuel Dennis Taber and Jane Pope, Handwritten family group sheets, unknown original source.
  2. [S104] Leslie Price's family documents and personal knowledge, all put together prior to 1998. Documentation will eventually be scanned and sourced more completely.
  3. [S73] Listenberger, Rosemary, Letter from Rosemary Listenberger to Barbara Brown with Taber family research attached, Recipient: Brown, Barbara, Author Address: Plymouth, IN (23 Mar 1993), from "Thomas Swinney, Donor of Fort Wayne's First Park"

Living

F, #688

Parents

FatherLiving
MotherJanet Waite (b. 3-Dec-1917, d. 11-Oct-2004)
Last Edited15-Mar-2012

Living

F, #689

Parents

FatherLiving
MotherJanet Waite (b. 3-Dec-1917, d. 11-Oct-2004)

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Last Edited14-Mar-2012

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F, #690

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FatherLiving
MotherElizabeth Waite (b. 18-Mar-1913, d. 29-Nov-1998)
Last Edited31-Mar-2012

Richard Michael Day1

M, #691, b. 15-Feb-1942, d. 16-Aug-1994

Parents

FatherLiving
MotherElizabeth Waite (b. 18-Mar-1913, d. 29-Nov-1998)

Biography

Person SourceRichard Michael Day had person sources.2
Birth15-Feb-1942He was born on 15-Feb-1942.3
Death16-Aug-1994He died on 16-Aug-1994 at age 52 in College Station, Brazos County, Texas, United States.B4
Last Edited14-Mar-2012

Citations

  1. [S72] Compiler: Price, Debbie, Genealogical Papers of the Price and Chamberlain Families, Present Owner: Leslie Price, Compiler Address: Casper, WY and Houston, TX (Houston, TX, 1976-1990), These papers were the result of research conducted by the compiler during her lifetime and include data collected from family members, records she inherited, and vital records collected from throughout the country
  2. [S354] Karen Anderson Smith, [e-mail for private use], to Leslie Price, e-mail, 3 March 2012, "Proposed Change: Family: Janet Waite (I725), and others," smith_karen_email_20120303_1.txt, smith_karen_email_20120303_2.txt, smith_karen_email_20120303_3.txt, lptex.com feedback via TNG Suggest tab, Leslie Price Collection; privately held by Price, [e-mail & address for private use], 2011, Karen contacted Leslie via the Feedback mechanisms at http://lptex.com. The emails have been saved, but are held privately and not published.
  3. [S72] Compiler: Price, Debbie, Genealogical Papers of the Price and Chamberlain Families, Present Owner: Leslie Price, Compiler Address: Casper, WY and Houston, TX (Houston, TX, 1976-1990)
  4. [S354] Karen Anderson Smith, [e-mail for private use], to Leslie Price, e-mail, 3 March 2012, "Proposed Change: Family: Janet Waite (I725), and others," smith_karen_email_20120303_1.txt, smith_karen_email_20120303_2.txt, smith_karen_email_20120303_3.txt, lptex.com feedback via TNG Suggest tab, Leslie Price Collection; privately held by Price, [e-mail & address for private use], 2011.

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Last Edited24-Mar-2012